Local Mentors

Building a Friendship
without a Curriculum

Become a MentorProfile of a Mentor

Alumni face unique challenges when they leave college. Even when they are “involved in a good church” this often means attending Sunday morning worship services, weekly Bible study, or serving through a church ministry.

All of these have their place, but:

  • Where is their PERSONAL relationship with the Lord?
  • Where is the trusted confidant with whom they can process the real life issues they are bombarded with? 
  • Who will be pointing them to the Lord’s power and presence, giving them perspective on their unique circumstances?

One-on-one mentoring relationships with seasoned believers provide the
specific guidance, encouragement, and friendship these graduates need.
They won’t find this type of relationship through programs
aimed at large groups or peer group Bible studies.

Our Approach towards Mentoring:

Instead of taking a “How To” attitude toward mentoring, we seek to establish a friendship and rich relationship with many dimensions, while guiding alumni to develop a relationship with God Himself.

Simply speaking, our approach involves:

  • Sharing life with alumni.
  • Integrating biblical principles into real life.
  • Reminding them of God’s good work.
  • Taking an interest in their lives.
  • Affirmation and encouragement.

Being a mentor is not as hard as you may think. On the other hand, it may not be as easy as it looks.

MENTORS CAN BE A PHYSICAL REPRESENTATION OF
“GOD WITH US”

Being a good mentor requires more interpersonal skills than following a Bible study curriculum. It requires the mentor to have their own rich, growing and current relationship with the Lord. We may not teach a structured curriculum (alumni have had enough of that over the past 20 years!), but our mentors interact and guide by example and life experience while trusting the Holy Spirit to do His work.

“The life experience is invaluable. Your peers of only 5 to 10 years
will have the same issues as you.
When you’re looking for someone to mentor you,
they need distance and experience to offer good advice.”

Ian, Memphis, TN